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News on Human Progress:
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A method for merging bacteria in human cells as "living implants" has been developed by University of Twente researchers. The implants could include stents equipped with bacteria on which endothelial cells (cells that form the lining of blood vessels) can grow, or bacteria that can release medicines in specific parts of the body. They achieved this
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 01 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Aarhus University) The scientific aims are bold, but the gains can be enormous. The new CADIAC research center at Aarhus University will be the most ambitious venture in the world to date to find the best methods to convert CO2 into medicine, plastic and useful chemicals. Even on Mars.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 01 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Griffith University) Griffith University scientists have made a remarkable breakthrough in the field of fluorescence enhancement via a discovery they believe could drive the next advances in sensor technology, energy saving and harvesting, lasers and optoelectronics.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 01 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Northwestern University) Professor Joseph M. DeSimone of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the recipient of the inaugural $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine, Northwestern University announced today. The Kabiller Prize is among the largest monetary awards in the US for outstanding achievement in the field of nanotechnology and its application to medicine and biology. In addition, Warren Chan, a professor at th... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 01 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(ITMO University) Researchers from ITMO University and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem discovered a novel mechanism of protein resurrection, which not only restores the active function of the protein, but also increases its original activity by almost two times. The scientists termed the observed phenomenon the Phoenix effect, drawing from the cross-culture mythology which uses the Phoenix legend as a symbol for rebirth into even stronger self.... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 01 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) According to Dr. Regev, 'Thermogravimetric Analysis on the material found it to be completely different from any other natural graphite flake products studied so far in our lab. The Zenyatta graphite appears to be composed of smaller and cleaner particles with a narrower particle size distribution. It is the same order of magnitude as more expensive, commercially available Graphene Nano Pla... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Lund University) Neurons thrive and grow in a new type of nanowire material developed by researchers in Nanophysics and Ophthalmology at Lund University in Sweden. In time, the results might improve both neural and retinal implants, and reduce the risk of them losing their effectiveness over time, which is currently a problem.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Forschungszentrum Juelich) Resistive memory cells or ReRAMs for short are deemed to be the new super information-storage solution of the future. At present, two basic concepts are being pursued, which, up to now, were associated with different types of active ions. But this is not quite correct, as Jülich researchers working together with their Korean, Japanese and American colleagues were surprised to discover. The effect enables switching char... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Texas at Austin) A team of researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has invented a method for producing inexpensive and high-performing wearable patches that can continuously monitor the body's vital signs for human health and performance tracking. The researchers believe their new method is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(North Carolina State University) Researchers have for the first time developed a technique that coats anticancer drugs in membranes made from a patient's own platelets, allowing the drugs to last longer in the body and attack both primary cancer tumors and the circulating tumor cells that can cause a cancer to metastasize. The work was tested successfully in an animal model.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Rice University) Variance spectroscopy, invented at Rice University, lets researchers learn more about mixed batches of fluorescent nanotubes by focusing on small areas of samples and comparing their contents.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Lehigh University) In a study published in Nature, a team of scientists map the strain in graphene, a 2-D sheet of carbon that is strong, flexible and can expand without breaking. Though the material has found its way into several applications, ranging from tennis rackets to smartphone touch screens, several obstacles are holding up further commercialization of graphene. One of these is the presence of defects that impose strain on graphene's lat... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Scientists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have developed a new class of molecular motors that rotate unidirectionally at speeds of up to 1 kHz when exposed to sunlight at room temperature. This unique combination of features opens up novel applications in nano-engineering.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Riverside) Can portabella mushrooms stop cell phone batteries from degrading over time? Researchers at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering think so.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 30 2015 by Thoughtbot
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New findings from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide the strongest evidence yet that liquid water flows intermittently on present-day Mars, NASA announced today. Researchers detected darkish signatures of hydrated minerals on slopes in several locations that appear to ebb and flow over time, based on spectrometer data. The signatures darken and appear to flow
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 29 2015 by Thoughtbot
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An ultra-thin invisibility “skin” cloak that can conform to the shape of an object and conceal it from detection with visible light has been developed by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley. Working with blocks of gold nanoantennas, the Berkeley researchers created a “skin cloak” just
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 29 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Tufts University biomedical engineers have developed low-energy, ultrafast laser technology for micropatterning high-resolution, 3-D structures in silk-protein hydrogels. Micropatterning is used to bring oxygen and nutrients to rapidly proliferating cells in an engineered tissue scaffold. The goal is "to controllably guide cell growth and create an artificial vasculature (blood vessel system) within an already densely
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 29 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Using nanometer-scale components, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have demonstrated the first optical rectenna, a device that combines the functions of an antenna and a rectifier diode to convert light directly into DC current. Based on multiwall carbon nanotubes and tiny rectifiers fabricated onto them, the optical rectennas could provide a new technology for energy
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 29 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Georgia Institute of Technology) Using nanometer-scale components, researchers have demonstrated the first optical rectenna, a device that combines the functions of an antenna and a rectifier diode to convert light directly into DC current.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 29 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(ETH Zurich) ETH material researchers are developing a procedure that allows them to mimic the complex fine structure of biological composite materials, such as teeth or seashells. They can thus create synthetic materials that are as hard and tough as their natural counterparts.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 28 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Physicists at Friedrich Schiller University in Germany are pushing the boundaries of nanoscale imaging by shooting ultra-high-resolution, real-time images in extreme ultraviolet light — without lenses. The new method could be used to study everything from semiconductor chips to cancer cells, the scientists say. They are improving a lensless imaging technique called "coherent diffraction imaging," which
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 26 2015 by Thoughtbot
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A novel brain-computer-interface (BCI) technology created by University of California, Irvine researchers has allowed a paraplegic man to walk for a short distance, unaided by an exoskeleton or other types of robotic support. The male participant, whose legs had been paralyzed for five years, walked along a 12-foot course using an electroencephalogram (EEG) brain-computer-interface system
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 26 2015 by Thoughtbot
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KurzweilAI has covered a wide variety of research projects that explore how DNA molecules can be assembled into complex nanostructures for molecular-scale diagnostics, smart drug-delivery, and other uses. For example, tailored DNA structures could find targeted cancer cells and release their molecular payload (drugs or antibodies) selectively. An article written by researchers from Aalto University
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 26 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have designed enzyme-functionalized micromotors the size of red blood cells that rapidly zoom around in water, remove carbon dioxide, and convert it into a usable solid form. The proof-of-concept study represents a promising route to mitigate the buildup of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas in the
KurzweilAI news made popular on September 26 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Georgia Institute of Technology) To provide a means for both comparing and selecting energy-harvesting nanogenerators for specific applications, the Georgia Tech research group that pioneered the triboelectric nanogenerator technology has now proposed a set of standards for quantifying device performance.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on September 26 2015 by Thoughtbot
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