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North Carolina State University (NC State) researchers have developed a bio-inspired system that models how human leg locomotion works, by using a computer-controlled nerve stimulator (acting as the spinal cord) to activate a biological muscle-tendon. The findings could help design robotic devices that begin to merge human and machine to assist human locomotion, serving as prosthetic
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 15 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Penn State University and University of Chicago researchers say an accidental discovery of a "quantum Etch-a-Sketch" may lead to a new way to use beams of light to draw and erase quantum circuits, and that could lead to the next generation of advanced computers and quantum microchips. The new technique is based on "topological insulators"
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 15 2015 by Thoughtbot
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  Tesla Motors will introduce on Thursday (Oct. 15) an advanced "beta test" set of autonomous driving features, The Wall Street Journal reports. The software will allow hands- and feet-free driving in everything from stop-and-go traffic to highway speeds, and enables a car to park itself, the journal says. It will be available for 50,000
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 15 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Case Western Reserve University) A Case Western Reserve University researcher has received a five-year, $2.82 million National Institutes of Health grant to make chain-like nanoparticles that can carry drugs across the blood-brain barrier to treat glioblastoma multiforme. The nanochains will carry traditional chemotherapy and glioblastoma stem cell inhibitors to destroy the tumor and eliminate cancer cells that are resistant.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 15 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) A team led by ETH Zurich's Mathieu Luisier used the Titan supercomputer to improve size and speed of nanoelectronics models.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 15 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Binghamton University) Binghamton University researchers have demonstrated an eco-friendly process that enables unprecedented spatial control over the electrical properties of graphene oxide. This two-dimensional nanomaterial has the potential to revolutionize flexible electronics, solar cells and biomedical instruments.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 15 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) This fall scientists at the University of Nebraska, with partners at Google, Inc. and the University of Idaho, introduced the latest evolution of METRIC technology -- an application called EEFLUX, which will allow anyone in the world to produce field-scale maps of water consumption.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 15 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have developed a deep-learning method that uses a wearable smartphone camera to track a person's activities during a day. It could lead to more powerful Siri-like personal assistant apps and tools for improving health. In the research, the camera took more than 40,000 pictures (one every 30 to 60 seconds)
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Brown University School of Engineering and Seoul National University researchers have combined optoelectronics and intracortical neural recording for the first time — enabling neuroscientists to optically stimulate neuron activity while simultaneously recording the effects of the stimulation on associated neural microcircuits. Described in the journal Nature Methods, the new compact, integrated device uses a semiconductor called
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Overturning nearly a century of a scientific dogma, Oregon State University chemists have now shown that  potassium could potentially replace rare, costly lithium in a new potassium-ion battery. “For decades, people have assumed that potassium couldn’t work with graphite or other bulk carbon anodes in a battery,” said Xiulei (David) Ji, the lead author of
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Your brain activity appears to be as unique as your fingerprints, a new Yale-led "connectome fingerprinting" study published Monday (Oct. 12) in the journal Nature Neuroscience has found. By analyzing* “connectivity profiles” (coordinated activity between pairs of brain regions) of fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) images from 126 subjects, the Yale researchers were able to
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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The FDA has approved the first 3D-printed drug — Aprecia’s SPRITAM (levetiracetam) for oral use as a prescription adjunctive therapy in the treatment of seizures in adults and children with epilepsy. SPRITAM manufacturing uses 3D printing to produce a porous formulation that rapidly disintegrates with a sip of liquid, making it easier to swallow. The
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Riverside) A team of scientists from the University of California, Riverside and three Mexican universities have received about $5 million in funding to support research to continue development of a novel transparent skull implant that literally provides a 'window to the brain.'
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(RIKEN) In a study published in Nature Communications, scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have found a way to manipulate skyrmions -- tiny nanometer-sized magnetic vortices found at the surface of magnetic materials -- using mechanical energy.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Chalmers University of Technology) Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in an experiment where they get an artificial atom to survive ten times longer than normal by positioning the atom in front of a mirror. The findings were recently published in the journal Nature Physics.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Osaka University) Six organizations including NIMS, Kyocera, Osaka University, NEC, Sumitomo Seika and NanoWorld jointly launched the MSS Alliance on Sept. 25, 2015, with the purpose of establishing a de facto standard for odor analysis and sensor systems employing an ultra-small sensor element called the Membrane-type Surface stress Sensor (MSS). This initiative is intended to accelerate practical use and popularization of such systems.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Argonne National Laboratory) Researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison are the first to grow self-directed graphene nanoribbons on the surface of the semiconducting material germanium. This allows the semiconducting industry to tailor specific paths for nanocircuitry in their technologies. Confirmation of the findings was done at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 14 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(University of Oregon) When the University of Oregon's Ramesh Jasti began making tiny organic circular structures using carbon atoms, the idea was to improve carbon nanotubes for use in electronics or optical devices. Now he believes his technique might roll solo. In a new paper, his team shows that his cycloparaphenylenes can be made using a variety of atoms, not just those from carbon.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 13 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Exotic ring-shaped magnetic effects called "skyrmions*" could be the basis for a new type of nonvolatile magnetic computer data storage, replacing current hard-drive technology, according to a team of researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and several universities. Skyrmions have the advantage of operating at magnetic fields that are several orders
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 10 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at Lund University have developed implantable multichannel electrodes that can capture signals from single neurons in the brain over a long period of time — without causing brain tissue damage, making it possible to better understand brain function in both healthy and diseased individuals. Current flexible electrodes can't maintain their shape when implanted, which
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 10 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Scientists have developed a first-ever technique for using skin samples from older patients to create brain cells — without first rolling back the youthfulness clock in the cells. The new technique, which yields cells resembling those found in older people’s brains, will be a boon to scientists studying age-related diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. “This
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 10 2015 by Thoughtbot
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A realistic 3D-printed robotic finger using a shape memory alloy (SMA) and a unique thermal training technique has been developed by Florida Atlantic University assistant professor Erik Engeberg, Ph.D. “We have been able to thermomechanically train our robotic finger to mimic the motions of a human finger, like flexion and extension,” said Engeberg. “Because of its
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 10 2015 by Thoughtbot
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Reddit published Stephen Hawking’s answers to questions in an “Ask me anything” (AMA) event on Thursday (Oct. 8). Most of the answers focused on his concerns about the future of AI and its role in our future. Here are some of the most interesting ones. The full list is in this Wired article. (His answers
KurzweilAI news made popular on October 10 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Penn State) An accidental discovery of a 'quantum Etch-a-Sketch' may lead to the next generation of advanced computers and quantum microchips. The lab's fluorescent lights generated surprising effects with potentially important impacts -- a new way of using beams of light to draw and erase quantum-mechanical circuits.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 10 2015 by Thoughtbot
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(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) Lasers with a wavelength of two microns could move the boundaries of surgery and molecule detection. Researchers at EPFL have managed to generate such lasers using a simple and inexpensive method.
Eurekalert.org news made popular on October 10 2015 by Thoughtbot
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