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Rice University researchers have formed graphene nanoribbons into a three-dimensional aerogel enhanced with boron and nitrogen as catalysts for fuel cells as a replacement for platinum. In tests involving half of the catalytic reaction that takes place in fuel cells, a team led by materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan and chemist James Tou discovered that versions with about
KurzweilAI news made popular 8 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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Scientists of the University of Luxembourg and of the Japanese electronics company TDK have extended sensitivity of a conductive oxide film used in solar cells in the near-infrared region to use more energy of the sun and thus create higher current. Similar attempts have been made before, but this is the first time that these
KurzweilAI news made popular 8 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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Computer scientists at Saarland University and Carnegie Mellon University are studying the potential use of the human body as a touch sensitive surface for controlling mobile devices. They have developed flexible silicone rubber stickers with pressure-sensitive sensors that fit snugly to the skin. By operating these touch input stickers, users can use their own body
KurzweilAI news made popular 8 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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(Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie) Berlin offers a rich variety of scientific institutions and universities. No wonder that a large number of research groups are actively using small-angle scattering and a vast number of complementary methods. This pairs with sample preparation techniques, projects in nearly the entire range of fields in which small-angle scattering can make a contribution and notably the user program of the H... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular 8 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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(University of Texas at Dallas) This technology reaches nearly 10 terahertz, the highest frequency manufactured in CMOS.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 8 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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Roboticist and aerospace engineer Julie Shah and her team at MIT are developing next-generation assembly line robots that are smarter and more adaptable than robots available on today's assembly lines. The team is designing the robots with artificial intelligence that enables them to learn from experience, so the robots will be more responsive to human behavior.
KurzweilAI news made popular about one day ago by Thoughtbot
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University of Minnesota researchers have found that an ultrathin black phosphorus film — only 20 layers of atoms — allows for high-speed data communication on nanoscale optical circuits. Black phosphorus is a crystaline form of the element phosphorus. The devices showed vast improvement in efficiency over comparable devices using graphene. The work by University of
KurzweilAI news made popular about one day ago by Thoughtbot
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(Brandeis University) In a new paper in Nature Materials, Brandeis University professor Zvonomir Dogic and his lab explored friction at the microscopic level. They discovered that the force generating friction is much stronger than previously thought. The discovery is an important step toward understanding the physics of the cellular and molecular world and designing the next generation of microscopic and nanotechnologies.
Eurekalert.org news made popular about one day ago by Thoughtbot
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(Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf) Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and Forschungszentrum Jülich together with a colleague at the French CNRS in Strasbourg have found a new way to electrically read out the orientation of magnetic vortices in nanodisks. Their method relies on measuring characteristic microwaves emanating from the vortices. Knowledge about these signals could be used for constructing extremely small compo... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular about one day ago by Thoughtbot
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(Technische Universitaet Muenchen) Magnetic vortex structures, so-called skyrmions, could in future store and process information very efficiently. They could also be the basis for high-frequency components. For the first time, a team of physicists succeeded in characterizing the electromagnetic properties of insulating, semiconducting and conducting skyrmion-materials and developed a unified theoretical description of their behavior. This lays th... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular about one day ago by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory) The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute have launched the Clean Energy Incubator Network. The program, funded by the Energy Department, aims to improve the performance of clean energy business incubators, connect critical industry and energy sector partners, and advance clean energy technologies emerging from universities and federal laborator... More
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(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) Just weeks after NSLS-II achieved first light, a team of scientists at the X-Ray Powder Diffraction beamline tested a setup that yielded data on thermoelectric materials and resulted in science published in Applied Physics Letters - Materials.
Eurekalert.org news made popular about one day ago by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, the University of Manchester, and the STFC Daresbury Laboratory are developing new software to increase the ability of supercomputers to process big data faster while minimizing increases in power consumption. To do that, computer scientists in the The Scalable, Energy-Efficient, Resilient and Transparent Software Adaptation (SERT) project are using "approximate
KurzweilAI news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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Computer chips’ clocks have stopped getting faster, so chipmakers are instead giving chips more cores, which can execute computations in parallel. Now, in simulations involving a 64-core chip, MIT computer scientists have improved a system that cleverly distributes data around multicore chips’ memory banks — increasing system computational speeds by 46 percent while reducing power consumption
KurzweilAI news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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By measuring a series of diffraction pattern from a virus injected into an XFEL beam, researchers at Stanford’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have determined the first three-dimensional structure of a virus, using a mimivirus. X-ray crystallography has solved the vast majority of the structures of proteins and other biomolecules. The success of the method relies
KurzweilAI news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(American Institute of Physics) A new study from a team of researchers in California and Japan shows that organic light emitting diodes made with finely patterned structures can produce bright, low-power light sources, a key step toward making organic lasers. The results are reported in a paper appearing this week on the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Rice University) Aerogels made of graphene nanoribbons and modified with boron and nitrogen are more efficient catalysts for fuel cells and air-metal batteries than expensive platinum is, according to researchers at Rice University.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(University of Cincinnati) A manipulation of light through tiny technology could lead to big benefits for everything from TVs to microscopes.
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(International Union of Crystallography) The first semi-liquid, non-protein nucleating agent for automated protein crystallization trials is described. This 'smart material' is demonstrated to induce crystal growth and will provide a simple, cost-effective tool for scientists in academia and industry.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - San Diego) A new simple tool developed by nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, is opening the door to an era when anyone will be able to build sensors, anywhere, including physicians in the clinic, patients in their home and soldiers in the field. The team from the University of California, San Diego, developed high-tech inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose. They tested the sen... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Riverside) What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and UCLA to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on organisms inadvertently exposed to them.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Riverside) Researchers in the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside have investigated a strategy to prevent this 'polysulfide shuttling' phenomenon by creating nano-sized sulfur particles, and coating them in silica, otherwise known as glass.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A nanodevice from MIT researchers can disable drug-resistance genes, then release cancer drugs.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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Jürgen Schmidhuber, Director of the Swiss Artificial Intelligence Lab (IDSIA), will do an AMA (Ask Me Anything) on reddit/r/MachineLearning on Wednesday March 4, 2015 at 10 AM EST. You can post questions now in advance in this thread. A key figure in AI in Europe and noted for his quirky sense of humor, Schmidhuber's ideas
KurzweilAI news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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A small area of the brain called the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in the thalamus can be optically stimulated to control pain, University of Texas at Arlington scientists have found. The researchers used optogenetic stimulation with a blue laser to control pain sensation in a mouse, created by a chemical irritant (formalin) and mechanical pain,
KurzweilAI news made popular 5 days ago by Thoughtbot
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