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Northwestern University engineers have developed a 3-D capture camera that produces high-quality images and works in all environments, including outdoors, overcoming limitations of Microsoft's Kinect. It's also designed to be inexpensive. The research is headed by Oliver Cossairt, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering, Both first and
KurzweilAI news made popular 17 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratoryhave created a new magnetic alloy that is an alternative to traditional rare-earth permanent magnets. The new alloy — a potential lower-cost replacement for high-performance permanent magnets found in automobile engines and wind turbines — eliminates the use of one of the scarcest and costliest rare earth
KurzweilAI news made popular 17 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong (UOW) are developing 3-D printed materials that morph into new structures under the influence of external stimuli such as water or heat. They refer to this process as "4-D printing," where the fourth dimension is time. The researchers are
KurzweilAI news made popular 17 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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As the world’s exponentially growing demand for digital data slows down the Internet and cell phone communication, City College of New York researchers may have just figured out a dramatic new way to increase transmission speed. “Conventional methods of data transmission [that] use light … are being exhausted by data-hungry technologies, such as smart phones
KurzweilAI news made popular 17 hours ago by Thoughtbot
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How many individual molecules does it take to automatically create a circuit? The answer: one, if you use light to switch it on and off, say scientists at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the University of Konstanz. The trick: a strong bond between individual atoms that weakens in one location and forms again precisely when energy is
KurzweilAI news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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How would it feel to be invisible? Neuroscientists at Sweden’s Karolinska Institutet have found out. It can actually changes your physical stress response in challenging social situations, for example. The history of literature features many well-known narrations of invisibility and its effect on the human mind, such as the myth of Gyges’ ring in Plato’s dialogue The
KurzweilAI news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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Declining U.S. federal government research investment — from just under 10 percent in 1968 to less than 4 percent in 2015 — in critical fields such as cybersecurity, infectious disease, plant biology, and Alzheimer’s are threatening an "innovation deficit," according to a new MIT report to be released Monday, April 27. U.S. competitors are increasing
KurzweilAI news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Griffith University) From mobile phones and computers to television, cinema and wearable devices, the display of full-color, wide-angle, 3-D holographic images is moving ever closer to fruition, thanks to international research featuring Griffith University.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Northwestern University) Northwestern University scientists have developed the first liquid nanoscale laser. And it's tunable in real time, meaning you can quickly and simply produce different colors, a unique and useful feature. The laser technology could lead to practical applications, such as a new form of a 'lab on a chip' for medical diagnostics. In addition to changing color in real time, the liquid nanolaser has additional advantages: it i... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular 2 days ago by Thoughtbot
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Engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, which could increase battery storage capacity. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better understanding of how to improve the
KurzweilAI news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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Google has introduced Project Fi, a new hybrid wireless service intended to help speed up mobile voice, text, and data by tapping into one million free, open Wi-Fi hotspots that Google has verified as fast and reliable. "Similar to our Nexus hardware program, Project Fi enables us to work in close partnership with leading carriers,
KurzweilAI news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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A research team in China has created genetically modified human embryos using the gene-editing technique CRISPR/Cas9, according to a report in the online journal Protein & Cell. The experiments were conducted by a research team led by Junjiu Huang of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. Human germline modification is widely considered unethical for both
KurzweilAI news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(University of Texas at Arlington) A University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineering researcher will use a National Science Foundation grant to discover as-yet-unknown materials that will provide better imaging, compute faster or make communications more secure.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Northwestern University) A new high-tech but simple ointment applied to the skin may one day help diabetic patients heal stubborn and painful ulcers on their feet, Northwestern University researchers report. They are the first to develop a topical gene regulation technology that speeds the healing of ulcers in diabetic animals. The scientists combined spherical nucleic acids with a common commercial moisturizer to create a way to topically knock ... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) Taking child's play with building blocks to a whole new level-the nanometer scale-scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have constructed 3-D 'superlattice' multicomponent nanoparticle arrays where the arrangement of particles is driven by the shape of the tiny building blocks. The method uses linker molecules made of complementary strands of DNA to overcome the blocks' tende... More
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(Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)) A memorandum of understanding was signed on April 20 between Pohang University of Science and Technology and Seoul National University Hospital as an open innovation initiative to create synergy by combining their respective strengths -- POSTECH's research capacity in life sciences and engineering related fields with SNUH's competence in biomedical science.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ) Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have unveiled an important step in the conversion of light into storable energy: together with scientists of the Fritz Haber Institute in Berlin and the Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland, they studied the formation of so-called polarons in zinc oxide. The pseudoparticles travel through the photoactive material until they are converted into electrical... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ) A honeycomb is a very stable structure. A larger hole, however, jeopardizes stability. What might a honeycomb look like, which survives external forces in spite of a hole? Such stable types of constructions might be useful in architecture or construction. So far, the mathematical expenditure required has been high and did not lead to success. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have found ... More
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) A Spanish-led team of European researchers at the University of Cambridge has created an electronic device so accurate that it can detect the charge of a single electron in less than one microsecond. It has been dubbed the 'gate sensor' and could be applied in quantum computers of the future to read information stored in the charge or spin of a single electron.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(Brown University) Using a technique that introduces tiny wrinkles into sheets of graphene, researchers from Brown University have developed new textured surfaces for culturing cells in the lab that better mimic the complex surroundings in which cells grow in the body.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Thermal imaging, microscopy and ultra-trace sensing could take a quantum leap with a technique being developed at ORNL.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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(University of California - Santa Barbara) Scientists use a novel form of nanotechnology to create a positionable silver cluster with DNA-programmed tunable fluorescent color.
Eurekalert.org news made popular 3 days ago by Thoughtbot
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Beckman Institute | New Super-Fast MRI Technique: Singing ‘If I Only Had a Brain' Scientists at the University of Illinois Beckman’s Biomedical Imaging Center (BIC) have developed a real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique capable of showing dynamic images of vocal movement at 100 frames per second — the fastest MRI speed in the world,
KurzweilAI news made popular 4 days ago by Thoughtbot
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More than 100 drugs have been approved to treat cancer, but predicting which ones will help a particular patient is an inexact science at best. Now a new implantable device developed at MIT can carry small doses of up to 30 different drugs promises to allow researchers to measure how effectively each one kills the
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Stanford Engineering | Ingmar Riedel-Kruse, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his team have created three related projects that begin to define the new field of interactive biotechnology. Stanford bioengineers have developed a new approach to teaching and experimenting, using "interactive biotechnology," with  "Biotic processing units" (BPUs) that allow for remotely interacting with
KurzweilAI news made popular 4 days ago by Thoughtbot
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